These are prints that form the basis for the latest ART BASEL posters, using metallic ink and neon ink combinations by Demian Conrad. Everything he / they design is awesome! I guess I just really really like swiss design. Though I wouldn’t mind having a set of these as actual art prints on my wall.

Incredibly wonderful Frankenstein book cover.

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rick-owen:

Chanel A/W 14

Gtfo

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Someday in the not-too-distant future, Chui says, a customer will be able to walk into the store, grab what she wants and simply leave. It may seem extreme, but IoT portends dramatic change in the customer experience.

“People have said when checkout is working really well, it will feel like stealing,” Chui says. “You grab a pair of shoes and you just walk out.”

A British company has produced a “strange, alien” material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the “super black” coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.

If it was used to make one of Chanel’s little black dresses, the wearer’s head and limbs might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.

Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material’s maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.

The nanotube material, named Vantablack, has been grown on sheets of aluminium foil by the Newhaven-based company. While the sheets may be crumpled into miniature hills and valleys, this landscape disappears on areas covered by it.

"You expect to see the hills and all you can see … it’s like black, like a hole, like there’s nothing there. It just looks so strange," said Ben Jensen, the firm’s chief technical officer.

Asked about the prospect of a little black dress, he said it would be “very expensive” – the cost of the material is one of the things he was unable to reveal.

"You would lose all features of the dress. It would just be something black passing through," he said.

Vantablack, which was described in the journal Optics Express and will be launched at the Farnborough International Airshow this week, works by packing together a field of nanotubes, like incredibly thin drinking straws. These are so tiny that light particles cannot get into them, although they can pass into the gaps between. Once there, however, all but a tiny remnant of the light bounces around until it is absorbed.

Vantablack’s practical uses include calibrating cameras used to take photographs of the oldest objects in the universe. This has to be done by pointing the camera at something as black as possible.

It also has “virtually undetectable levels of outgassing and particle fallout”, which can contaminate the most sensitive imaging systems. The material conducts heat seven and a half times more effectively than copper and has 10 times the tensile strength of steel.

Stephen Westland, professor of colour science and technology at Leeds University, said traditional black was actually a colour of light and scientists were now pushing it to something out of this world.

"Many people think black is the absence of light. I totally disagree with that. Unless you are looking at a black hole, nobody has actually seen something which has no light," he said. "These new materials, they are pretty much as black as we can get, almost as close to a black hole as we could imagine."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/blackest-is-the-new-black-scientists-have-developed-a-material-so-dark-that-you-cant-see-it-9602504.html

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crystallizations:

Outtakes from David Bowie’s 1977 “Heroes” cover photo shoot by Masayoshi Sukita.

gtfo

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dailydesigner:

AuRevoir Magazine SS14 by Think Work Observe

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Since the dawn of the internet the world has been asking: “Why are hover interactions so boring?” Only recently has a new paradigm arisen to solve this emotionally crippling problem. Designers call them Giflinks. It is a little known fact, but 9 out of 10 UX specialists agree that giflinks provide a richer, more enhanced user experience, which can be tailored specifically for the enjoyment of your audience. This javascript library will help you bring Giflinks to your site, house, and home!
yalegraphicdesign:

versocovers: Henri Lefebvre, The Critique of Everyday Life: The One-Volume Edition. Design by Neil Donnelly (MFA 2009). 
This is an omnibus version of Lefebvre’s classic three-volume text. It’ll probably remain in print for the next couple decades, so we wanted something which felt substantial and iconic — and, given the subject matter, a little self-aware. Rather than simply use the front cover as a surface for imagery, Neil once again produced a cover which acknowledges the book as an object. (Photographs courtesy Verso’s twitter feed.)

yalegraphicdesign:

versocovers: Henri Lefebvre, The Critique of Everyday Life: The One-Volume Edition. Design by Neil Donnelly (MFA 2009). 

This is an omnibus version of Lefebvre’s classic three-volume text. It’ll probably remain in print for the next couple decades, so we wanted something which felt substantial and iconic — and, given the subject matter, a little self-aware. Rather than simply use the front cover as a surface for imagery, Neil once again produced a cover which acknowledges the book as an object. (Photographs courtesy Verso’s twitter feed.)

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The lesson I learned from that: usability studies are important. But you can’t just take the recommendations of a usability study; you have to implement the recommendations, do another study, be prepared to be frustrated that the new version is just as bad as the old one, and do it all again. And again. If that’s not how you’re doing usability studies, you’re doing it wrong.
apenwarr on a lesson learned from The trouble with computers, which book is now in my wish list.

“The first pass should be ugly, the ugliest.” 

cameronmoll:

Craig Mod, who convincingly argues that app development (and their success) is often completely senseless, drops this astounding wisdom on readers about halfway through the article:

The first pass should be ugly, the ugliest. Any brain cycle spent on pretty is self deception. If pretty is the point then please stop. Do not, I repeat, do not spent three months on the radial menu, impressive as it may be. It will not save your company. There is a time for that. That time is not now. Instead, make grand gestures. General gestures. Most importantly, enumerate the unknowns. Make a list. Making known the unknowns you now know will surface the other unknowns, the important unknowns, the truly devastating unknowns — you can’t scrape our content! you can’t monkey park here! a tiny antennae is not for rent! You want to unearth answers as quickly as possible. Nothing else matters if your question marks irrecoverably break you. Do not procrastinate in their excavation.

Craig’s words ring loudly in my ears. You want to unearth answers as quickly as possible. Do not procrastinate in their excavation.

Superb advice for the exploration phase of just about any project, not just app development.

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Dior Homme S/S 2015 at PFW

want

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disalmanac:

New diagram.

infographic/p>

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