brucesterling:

Direct from Soundcloud, it’s The Cure

usability testing

(via ronenreblogs)

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

(via pipilottirist)

The median length of a privacy policy from the top 75 websites turned out to be 2,514 words. A standard reading rate in the academic literature is about 250 words a minute, so each and every privacy policy costs each person 10 minutes to read.

Next, they had to figure out how many websites, each of which has a different privacy policy, the average American visits. Surprisingly, there was no really good estimate, but working from several sources including their own monthly tallies and other survey research, they came up with a range of between 1,354 and 1,518 with their best estimate sitting at 1,462.

So, each and every Internet user, were they to read every privacy policy on every website they visit would spend 25 days out of the year just reading privacy policies! If it was your job to read privacy policies for 8 hours per day, it would take you 76 work days to complete the task.

mudwerks:

absurdonio:

Flying Citroen DS in the film “Fantômas” (1964).

need this…

art.

(via accidentallydomesticated)

(via ronenreblogs)

dominicewan:

Hand drawn hypercube animation.I’ve been facinated by the fourth dimension for really quite long, this gif goes between a hypercube in 0,1,2,3,4 dimensions and back again.  

dominicewan:

Hand drawn hypercube animation.
I’ve been facinated by the fourth dimension for really quite long, this gif goes between a hypercube in 0,1,2,3,4 dimensions and back again.  

(via notational)

fruitsoftheweb:

4-Dimensional Rotation


If this was not done with a horse I would not have been able to make heads or tails out of it.

fruitsoftheweb:

4-Dimensional Rotation

If this was not done with a horse I would not have been able to make heads or tails out of it.

(via notational)

The Hungarian Guggenheim
by Krisztián Lakosi & Lakosi Richárd

(via thegraphicsideof)

neil-gaiman:

If you think this is not the best thing in the world, I am afraid you are wrong.

it’s funny because it’s true…

Steve Jobs unveils the iWatch

jkottke:

Steve Jobs Keynote

The analysis of the weak parts of Apple’s recent introduction of the iPhone 6 and Apple Watch at the beginning of this piece is good, but the real gem is the complete reworking of the presentation as Steve Jobs might have approached it.

Jobs: It’s not easy being an engineer at Apple. (Laughs) How do you take the world’s best phone and make it even better? (Cheers)

When we first launched the iPhone back in 2007, we didn’t anticipate the central role it plays today-how it would touch every part of our lives. (Cheers)

Seven years later, our iPhones are the window to our world. Through this window I see my wife and kids. I see my friends, take care of work, and relax.

If this window is so important, what if we made it a little bigger?

(Steve holds out his hand and starts separating his fingers as if he’s stretching an iPhone)

(Once they get really far, he grins and quickly pushes them back together)

Jobs: But not too big! (Audience chuckles) You still want to be able to hold it in one hand and fit it inside your pocket.

Our team of smart engineers have come up with the perfect size.

The heartfelt folksiness is pitch perfect. And the whole thing about the iWatch is amazing:

Jobs: The iWatch comes with a special sensor that detects your heartbeat. In addition to linking to Apple Health, it does something very special.

Something very dear to me.

I’d like to see how my daughter is doing. Instead of sending her a text, what can I do? I press this button twice, and… (Heartbeats echo in the auditorium)

You can’t see it, but my watch is vibrating to her heartbeat. I can close my eyes and know that my daughter is alive, living her life halfway around the globe.

Not sure if Jobs would have approached it this way, but it made me actually want to get an Apple Watch. (via @arainert)

I joined the keynote late and saw a piece live, but decided I was not really interested in actually seeing and hearing it, it sounded boring. Just reading the liveblogged information was enough; that would not have happened under Steve. And reading this gave me goosebumps and made me want a Apple Watch as well… tear up and sob for I have a small daughter and I wonder how who will grow up and what the world will be like when she grows up and how it would feel to be able to feel her heartbeat and, damn Steve! I need to buy everyone in my family an iWatch now!

(NB - Reading the biography Steve Jobs relationship with his first daughter was difficult / estranged. Though I do not doubt he loved his children very much. ( And like Don Draper in Mad Men I think he could and would use it to sell his product.) And he limited the technology his children were allowed to use. Which actually we are as well, I am not going to buy any Apple Watch for some time I think.)

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